TREATING PECKING SORES IN CHICKEN

CHICKEN

It gets annoying when you see your hen with a wound, especially if it is the first time. However, I’ll advise you to keep cool and follow the steps below to speed up the recovery process.

At first, you should always isolate any sick bird from other birds until the recovery processes are complete. This will try to curb the spread of diseases in poultry and ensure there’s an optimum animal health in your poultry. 

STEPS TO TREATING A CHICKEN WITH A PECKING SORE

  • STEP 1

Carefully clean the wound with a clean towel or soft gauze till the bleeding stops. Cornstarch can also help stop the bleeding quickly if you are having trouble stopping it.

  • STEP 2 

Apply HealXcel Poultry Care to the wound. This spray, which is simple to use, will clean the wound and provide poultry healing quickly by killing bacteria and preventing infections. To keep the area clean, apply four times per day.

The proprietary formulation of HealXcel produces a potent natural vasodilator that increases circulation to bring more antibodies and leukocytes to the site of the wound. The result is natural, quick, and safe healing that minimizes scarring and encourages hair regrowth. The 

Carefully apply the liquid with a dropper if the wound is close to a hen’s eye or ear.

  • STEP 3

After the wound has healed, reunite the hen with the other chickens. Watch out for the flock’s behavior to check for abnormalities.

Always have HealXcel Poultry Care at hand for any wounds that may surface later in the future.

BUT WHAT CAUSES THESE WOUNDS ON MY CHICKEN?

Chickens tend to get wounds by;

  • Picking their feathers
  • Pecking each other
  • Aggressive roosters
  • Injuries

Chickens enjoy pecking at each other and their food as much as they do. This conduct is generally ordinary; it is a type of communication that likewise lays out a progressive system among the hens. Unless the pecking becomes too aggressive, it is otherwise considered normal. 

In addition, the behaviors of chickens may even be influenced by their breed, with some breeds naturally being more passive while others are more aggressive.

The bare skin of a hen is more susceptible to wounds when growing feathers. Chickens, as we all know, don’t have thick, tough skin like mammals; instead, they’ve got thin skin that makes it easy to tear and bleed. You will observe feather loss around the wound as well as bleeding or blood if this bare skin is pecked. 

Since chickens’ open wounds are susceptible to infection, prompt injury identification and prompt treatment are essential.

HOW ABOUT MY BIRD PICKING THE FEATHERS OF OTHER BIRDS?

Occasionally, hens will aggressively remove other hens’ feathers in an attempt to harm them. This is not only painful for the chicken but also a pattern of behavior that rarely goes away on its own. In fact, the chickens may become agitated when they see blood, which could lead to cannibalism.

In addition to chickens, feather pecking is common in ducks, pheasants, and turkeys. The wounds must be treated immediately, and the flock’s behavior must be addressed.

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