Viral News Magazine

4 Bad North Carolina Killers

The new coach had to be broken. He wants to boost the Portland State project he just took over. And bringing a man to the NFL will go a long way, but he also knows if he will sell too many players. He will lose credibility. So in the fall of 1973, as Ron Straten sat in the amphitheater at Multnomah Stadium, now Providence Park, home of the MLS Timbers, he chose to speak carefully.

NFL scouts approached isaac alton barnes, the Vikings’ top receiver, who was impressed with Woodfield’s hands and athleticism. But when he asked Stratten to investigate further, the trainer hesitated: “Randy hit a good track,” Stratten enthused. “And the looks are good,” he said positively of the speed with which Woodfield was able to clear the high hurdles for the school’s track and field team. But he also mentions Woodfield’s glaring flaw: He doesn’t like to hit. Not with security, not by guards, without anyone.

The I-5 KILLER is rebuilt by his former teammates and coach

“He’s the sweetest kid. And the sweetest thing I ever knew: Years later, a San Francisco newspaper reporter called me and asked, “Do you know Randall Woodfield? You know he’s the I-5 killer?” I said, ‘That’s impossible. Probably Randall’s foul pitch.’

– Gary Hamble

PSU receivers coach from 1972-73.

When Stratten was named Portland State’s head coach last year, it was a rarity. However, it was almost unknown at the time. But he is only the second modern African-American to hold the position at a predominantly white school. Stratten was only 29 years old, having played less than a decade at Oregon. And as a former quarterback, he quickly noticed that the receiver wasn’t cutting down the middle of the field. “It’s character,” Stratten told scouts. Woodfield isn’t having it.

For Stratten, that softness, his aversion to confrontation, suited Woodfield’s laid-back personality, not just that Woodfield was coachable. He seemed to seek favors and advice from the staff more than the rest of the team. “He used to walk past our office before going to school,” Stratten recalled. “It was like he just wanted to hang himself. with us.”

The memories of Woodfield’s teammates and coaches are radically different. Some remember him as humble and quiet, if a little odd. “He didn’t really fit in with the team,” said Anthony Stoudamire, a freshman at Princeton University in 1973. “He was talking out of the box and outside.” He was the 1995-96 NBA Rookie of the Year. Damon Stoudamire) was the defender of this team. He remembered Woodfield for his absurdity. “[Randall] always took care of himself. It helped his game. She seems more interested in looking good than getting the job done. ” Woodfield’s pride in his appearance is reasonable, he is six feet tall with little body fat. Translucent muscles and devilish smiles surround what might be called pornography these days. In exchange for a cut, he had no trouble finding female friends. “He’s kind, he’s smart,” said Prince John Kerry, Prince Songkla University’s 72nd provost. “Confident but not stubborn”.

Woodfield is best known at PSU for his commitment to the Campus Crusade for Christ and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. It was like he was holding her back.”

With the available resources — and facing PR pressure — on modern NFL teams, the Packers are charged with conducting a detailed background check on Woodfield, and the proverbial red flag is flashing furiously. Grew up in the beautiful town of Otter Rock on the Oregon coast. Woodfield grew up in an aggressively middle-class home. His father held a solid executive position at the Pacific Northwest Bell Telephone Company; His mother is a homemaker and Woodfield has two sisters to take care of him. The family is well known and well established in the community, on the surface Woodfield’s portrait seems normal, but in high school it is not the same. He was caught standing on a bridge and exposing himself to a woman. His parents sent him to a therapist. Which still doesn’t bother me about the teenage gender test. According to our legal staff

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