Apple’s new pitch to consumers: Think darker

But if you watched one of the company’s iPhone events yesterday, you might be wondering how Apple will market its products in a time of coronavirus, economic uncertainty, war, and the threat of climate change. It’s clear that you have different ideas.

as my colleague Samantha Kelly’s Notethe opening of the event felt like watching an emergency first responder training session, aimed at our deepest fears.

In a three-minute video, Apple has established itself as a lifesaver in times of crisis. After a man skating on a frozen river falls through the ice, his Apple Watch calls for help. The watch notifies another person of atrial fibrillation. A teenager survived a winter plane crash by calling his 911 on his watch.

It’s a very different tone change from Apple’s usual pitch: Apple’s products are tools for creativity. A must have for aspiring photographers, designers and outdoor enthusiasts to capture their epic adventures and share them on social media. Admittedly, that spirit was still a bit lingering, but it was hard to ignore the dark message that Apple products not only save lives, but that not having one can be fatal.

As I wrote here yesterday, the new iPhone features were few and far between. The iPhone 14 isn’t all that different from its predecessor. What’s New:

  • Automotive collision detection technology found in both Apple Watch and iPhone
  • An emergency SOS tool for your iPhone that relies on satellites, for example, if you get lost in the wilderness and your cellular service isn’t working.
  • Apple Watch temperature monitoring that can be used to track illness. We are still in a pandemic in case someone forgets.

Ramon Llamas, head of research at market research firm IDC, said: “It was a little surprising that Apple would dabble in a alarmist approach and position its devices as potential lifesavers.

Here is the message: We hope you never have to use these services, but wouldn’t it be nice to have them next time you’re out in the woods alone?

The somewhat cynical reality here is that Apple products are top shelf and inflation is eating into people’s disposable income. The company has to convince consumers that smartwatches, which range from $250 to as high as $800 for the cheapest version, are worth the extra cash.

shameless plug

Check it out this week too nightcap show Host John Surlyn cooks as A+ commentary on the latest in Elon Musk’s feud with Twitter, Elizabeth Holmes’ bid for a new trial, and her return to the great office.

Number of days: $30,000

General Motors has revealed a new electric SUV that it expects to be the cheapest compact electric SUV on the market when it hits the market in about a year. Starting price around $30,000 This makes it one of the cheapest electric cars of any kind.

According to Edmunds.com, the average electric car available today has a base price of about $47,500.

food news

Welcome to another update from the unofficial CNN Snack Beat. It records all news suitable for human consumption. Let’s start with cocktails…

First: Boozy Fresca (Hallelujah)

The Fresca HQ scammers have been making fun of this since January, but finally we can stop mixing vodka and Fresca ourselves like animals and buy cute little cans mixed professionally. I can do it.

Fresca Mix comes in two flavors: Vodka Spritz and Tequila Paloma.

For starters, Fresca is nearly perfect, though I’m baffled by how it’s less noticeable than other zero-calorie sodas. There was Fresca, a drink that has a diet but has no diet effect. (Of course, it’s still out there in drunken and unboosted form. But why can’t most restaurants order it? People don’t know what they’re missing.)

then just add water

OK, trigger warning: This might sound pretty awful, but bear with me.

Kellogg thinks he’s found a workaround for when you’re craving cereal and run out of milk. Pour in cold water, rehydrate the milk, and voila.

I’ve heard — the idea of ​​pouring water on cereal is objectively terrifying, but My colleague Daniel Wiener Bronner tried Raisin Bran Crunch Instabowl, and decided it wasn’t so bad.

Honestly, I’m surprised it took Big Cereal this long to come up with this here in America.shudder*Microwavable bacon egg cheese.

Now we move on to the third course of the night, Snacks.

Americans, we are a snacking people. But it wasn’t always the case.

As Danielle explains, Doritos, Cheetos, Ruffles, PopCorners, Smartfood and SunChips saw double-digit sales growth in the second quarter. The snack market is growing as our attitudes towards life and food evolve.

The three-meal model is now a remnant of the Industrial Revolution. For better or worse, the 2020s are all about snacks.Read Daniel’s entire fascinating history here.
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Source: www.cnn.com

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